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of the united states. when you are making laws, it is not your prerogative to put your party first. host: alright. mr. woodward. guest: as i pointed out in the book, there is scene after scene where the republicans show that they will not budge on some of these things. in their view, they are adhering to the constitution. in their view, they're doing what is necessary. but the key point is that speaker boehner is at least a nominal leader of the republicans in the house and open these negotiations last year with the president. they're all kinds of offers and discusons going back and forth on this. you can see the detail and you -- you may blameahaw obama or you may blame the republicans or you may blame me for writing this. but this is, if you will, the performance review. this is what we used to always call the best obtainable version of the truth. host: 1 last phone call for you. south carolina. caller: please let me stay few facts and don't cut me off. host: we don't have time for a few facts. caller: first, i want to compliment mr. woodward on his book. i know he is a very intelligen
this before. go to december, 1941, pearl harbor is bombed. the united states entered world war ii. it looks really grim. it looks like we possibly can not win this war. franklin roosevelt found a way to do it. leaders have to fix problems. i do not think it 1% of the people will remember who the speaker of the house is during world war ii. it is in the president's grasped. the president has that responsibility. what's interesting, i think president obama realizes that. i would expect governor romney, if he becomes president, would realize that, too. that is where the buck stops, as has been said. host: on obstruction, we get a lot of people talking about what mitch mcconnell said, the republican's main goal after obama wins. your reporter about what he said and the full context of what he said. guest: he's a tough guy. his goal is to make sure that obama is a one-term president. my assistant dug in to that interview. we wanted to find out when mcconnell said that and exactly what he said. it turns out what he also said in that interview was, "i don't want obama to fail. i want him to change
. but the u.s. has declined. the united states has never proposed iran a comprehensive package. never. my point is this. first, try at least once. i real hi don't care in iran whether we have a conservative or moderate president or reformist because i have been working for 16 years under the presidents and i know we did our utmost to get a good -- to bring the relation, to improve the relation with the u.s. and the u.s. always declined. therefore, this is the same policy during ahmadinajed. but they have better justification during ahmadinajed. they use the holocaust and all the these rhetorics which is very harmful for iran's national interests. my suggestion is this. any u.s. administration i hope after the election -- because we cannot talk before the election -- propose at least once after 33 years a comprehensive package including terrorism, weapons of mass destruction, peace process, israel, human rights, democracy, all these major points for the u.s. and iranians also they have their own shopping list. and the u.s. also should be prepared to address iranian concerns. if it failed,
the united states, i am sure libya receives money. it was even greater because the american ambassador -- i am supportive of the arab spring. the times and elsewhere, i said to myself, they are not great people. but they are people that surely will turn out nice to us. it doesn't make any sense. >> the events of the last week, the embassy attacks, it will result in a further ongoing shift of jewish americans changing -- >> i think there is a little more to follow. the shift in special elections indicated deep distrust of this administration. that was clear. what the administration said, you heard what the state said. the message was sent loud and clear. for a while, i think it was always together. we have heard the state department say that they have taken every reasonable step. we have heard the quote from the ambassador suggesting he was comfortable and these people love me. it's not true. he issued a statement saying he is very concerned about his own safety. again, we have an information gap. that is coming home to roost. this will build. >> today's new york times, the interview with th
know one thing about him. he does not fail. let's hear it for the next president of the united states. [applause] >> thanks, sweetie. that's quite an introduction here. i got how many introductions tonight? anyone else want to offer an introduction? thank you. this really is a critical time for the country, and i think a time of choice. elections are always about choice. i think the choice is in more stark relief than most electrics. i think in part because of where the country is. i think when you have $16 trillion in debt, when you see places like europe facing fiscal calamity or crisis, while you recognize these are critical times, what you have in this country, 23 million americans out of work, 23 million. when half the kids coming out of college can't find work or work consistent with an education that includes college, think about that? this is america. what's happened? and so the president and i offered two very distinct paths. his path is one which has been not just spoken about, we've seen it. we don't have to guess what his path might look like or what he would do, because h
on that subject. [cheers and applause] the united states has to accept its full responsibility for leadership in american affairs. we are the backers and the people that organized and started the united nations. first started under that great democratic party. the league was sabotaged by the republicans in 1920 and we must see that the united nations continues a strong and growing body so we can have everlasting peace in the world. we removed the trade barriers in the world, which is the best message we can have for peace. we have started a program which means that u.s., china, and the far east. we have instituted programs, and i will tell you that all these things were done in a cooperative, bipartisan manner. the foreign relations committees in the senate and the house were taken in the full house, and don't let anyone tell you anything else. as i have said time and time again, foreign policy should be the policy of the whole nation and not a policy of one party or the other. partisanship should start at the edge, and i continue to preach that through this whole campaign. i'd like to say a
the united states as the move towards a democracy. the obama administration has said it is considering using sanctions against myanmar, also known as burma. this is one hour and 15 minutes. >> well, welcome to all of you. this is my first official of bent as the new president. what a thrill, frankly, to be here with you. her first visit to the united states in 20 years. no. a 40 years. and she chose to come to the institute for her first public address. we have wonderful partners in the society. and the blue moon a society. we have a great relationship with the state department of secretary clinton today. a number of her colleagues are here. kurt campbell. in addition, i would like to particularly recognize a couple of our board members. without her, i do not think this event would have occurred. i would like to thank her for coming. i like to turn things over. [applause] >> i join with jim. i want to tell you that this is an extremely large and important a pleasure that we have in welcoming all of you here today. it is an event in honor of remarkable individual. we welcome you and your dele
are not going to t along with anyone, so why try to pacify them? england, the united states, get out of the united nations. i'm tired of hearing hate speeches from people from other countries condemning us. this is a united nations of hate. host: if you go to the united nations web site, it says -- what you think? caller: i think at the time it was probably a good thing, but i don't think they counted on the rise of communism from china and russia and on the muslims and i think the muslims are a big problem with the united nations right now and we should stop trying to pacify them. we have a wenow who seems to sit there and watched-- we have a president now who seems to sit there and watch it. all he has been doing is apologizing. they killed two of our soldiers in afghanistan and the apologized to them. when the embassy was attacked, it was the man who had the movie's iffault. these people hate us. host: here is this on twitter -- here's the washington post front page -- many remember last year when the palestinian leader's request for membership was denied, not something supported
that egypt receives from the united states and i'm sure libya receives money -- i don't know how much, but i'm sure it does. and the amount was greater because the imbass door from libya had help arab spring. i've never been supportive of the arab spring. i know the columnists and the "times" and elsewhere extol it. we're friends with people who i'm sure will turn time-out be hostile to us. it doesn't make any sense. why should anybody trust us in the future? i'm not talking about mubarak how we threw him under the bus. those were the background facts that caused me to react strongly. >> congressman, you are very much the beneficiary of a shift in jewish vote in your district of queens and brooklyn. do you think the events, the attacks will result in yet a further ongoing shift of jewish americans changing -- >> i do. and i think there's a little more to follow. the shift in the special election indicated the distrust of this administration. and it was clear we heard what he said. we heard what the administration say and people didn't believe it. and the message was sent loud and clear. and
, president of the united states of america. >> mr. president, mr. secretary general, fellow delegates, ladies and gentleman, i would like to begin today by telling you about an american named chris stevens. chris was born in a town called grass valley, california, the son of a lawyer and a musician. as a young man, chris joined the peace corps, and taught english in morocco. and he came to love and respect the people of north africa and the middle east. he would carry that commitment throughout his life. as a diplomat, he worked from egypt to syria, from saudi arabia to libya. he was known for walking the streets of the cities where he worked -- tasting the local food, meeting as many people as he could, speaking arabic, listening with a broad smile. chris went to benghazi in the early days of the libyan revolution, arriving on a cargo ship. as america's representative, he helped the libyan people as they coped with violent conflict, cared for the wounded, and crafted a vision for the future in which the rights of all libyans would be respected. and after the revolution, he supported the birt
] and governor romney has made it absolutely clear that he will never apologize for the great united states of america. governor romney was right last week when he out after the embassies were attacked in cairo. [applause] and condemned the statement that our embassy released. we have extremists coming over the walls of our embassy, and they are burning our walls and the department of state apologizes for people who have hurt the religious feelings of muslims. governor romney added exactly right. and he had it right the next day, too. [applause] although the administration's response to the crisis of the last 10 days or so has been appalling, anyone watching could not have been surprised. this president has made it clear he wants to bring america back, he wants to put us in retrieve. he has also failed to stand with our most important ally the state of israel. -- most important ally, the state of israel. governor romney has said he will stand shoulder to shoulder with israel and he will ensure through whatever means is necessary that iran, the world's leading sponsor of terror, is never all
an address by his excellency, felipe calderon, president of the united mexican states. . [no audio] [no audio] >> on behalf of the general assembly, i have the honor to welcome to the united nations, his excellency felipe calderon hinojosa, president of the united mexican state to address the assembly. [applause] >> send your president take -- -- mr. president and head of state and ladies and gentlemen -- out of conviction and as a result of history, mexico is a strategic ally of the united nations. we were one of the founding countries of the united nations and as a founding country, we fully share its fundamental precepts, the precepts of our great organization. for me, this will be the last time i will be attending as the president of mexico. it will be the last time i attended the general assembly of the united nations. over the past six years, my country has taken part in very different fora to pave the way for you and initiatives. we have endeavored to strengthen the u n and make it the main body for dialogue and peace and for security and for the application of international law and, i
to dissociate the united states from that hateful video that insulted the prophet of islam. he said that there are important rights of free speech under the first amendment and we have to protect those rights, and if the government a press free-speech, it makes the world a less free place. he also had a message for iran, that while we want to negotiate through diplomacy if possible, time is not unlimited. that was a warning to the iranian government, which has been obstreperous and very difficult to deal with. i think it was a very important speech the president gave in new york. host: how about mitt romney? can you assess from what you have heard and hear him write these past few months? is there a romney doctrine on foreign policy? how would you encapsulate it? guest: i don't know if there is a romney doctrine yet. governor romney is a very smart, successful person. my guess is that it is not the issue he wants to emphasize in the campaign. once the campaign to be about the economy and the unemployment rate. it is a difficult position for a republican to be running against a democ
is it that the united states pays 22% of the bill and japan pays only 12% ? guest: china, i think the number is 3.1%. that is what is insane. if you add in the money they get from the one, it is much lower. host: in germany, they only have 80 million people, they pay 8%. guest: we are suckers. they know, our checkbooks are open. i have no problem giving $8 billion to the u.n. if i knew it was working. if i knew these people were solved and the problems of the world, i have no problem. the reality is, they are throwing the money away. we are acting as classic enablers. no different than somebody who is unable in a drug addict or a gambler. if it continued to give these people what they want without forcing behavior, what forces them to change their behavior? host: here is another excerpt. guest: the ivory coast was a former french colony. they had independence. they have had a number of major problems. a civil war raging on for years. the u.n. came in. host: you are trying to interview somebody. guest: trying to. the head of the un peacekeeping. host: let's watch a little bit. >> i grabbed my came
respect our common humanity. i have made it clear that the united states had nothing to do with this video. it is an insult to muslims, and everyone. we are the home to muslims worship across our country. we not only respect the freedom of religion, we have laws that protect individuals from being harmed because of how they look or what they believe. we understand why people take offense to this video because millions of our citizens are among them. host: more headlines following these speeches, "obama talks tough on mideast extremism." "uses addressed to regain the initiative on foreign policy." if you look at the front page of "the washington times" this , the right "the expected campaign advantage on foreign policy suddenly in doubt, the president portrayed the deaths of the americans in libya has inflamed tensions over an anti- islamic movie rather than tensions based on american policy in the middle east." from "the washington times," the headline says "romney, exchange for reform." "seeking to carve ou host: here is mitt romney at the clinton global initiative. [video clip] >> the pr
-- the world of nation-state, those independent units that are truly sovereign and do not depend or take orders from anywhere else. the west can no longer do what it assumed it could do for its citizens. it needs to reach out for help. so you have got this system living in an uneasy coexistence with this globalize the world, and you say, "are we losing power?" though the very nature of power is different now than it used to be. you all in your textbooks say, cassette and these are the elements of national power -- economy, this, that, and the other" -- "these are the elements of national power -- economy, this, that, and the other," but it is much more complicated now. >> i would add that the concept of what makes up national security has changed. it is a much broader field now. you have to deal with economic issues. you have to deal with cybersecurity. you have to deal with a world that is largely asymmetric. as we play it back on the 20th century, which was not that long ago, you almost yearn for the ordered ways of the 20th century. we had essentially a bipolar world, two different ideologie
. the united states drew a clear, red line. iran backed off. different lines can be drawn in the i iranian nuclear program. but to be credible, a line must be drawn first and foremost in one vital part of their program -- on their efforts to enrich uranium. let me explain why. any bomb consists of an explosive material and a mechanism to ignite it. the simplest example is fuse.der in and a you light the fuse and set off the gunpowder. the gunpowder is enriched uranium in regards to iran's nuclear program. the fuse is a detonator. for iran, amassing enough uranium is far more difficult than producing a nuclear fuse. for a country like iran, it takes many, many years to enrich uranium for a bomb. that requires thousands of center fuses spinning in tandem in big industrial plants. those are green plants are visible. they are still vulnerable. in contrast, iran could produce a record detonator, the fuse, in a lot less time. maybe under a year. maybe only a few months. the detonator can be made in a small workshop the size of the classroom. it might be difficult to find and target that workshop
to where they were, we were in belt largest expansion in the history of the united states. fix medicare. allow negotiations for prescription drugs. that will save $240 billion over 10 years, and finally, takeaway subsidies from the big oil companies. they are very profitable, but they do not need our help. what you end up with then is not a $1 trillion problem. you end up with a problem in the $200 billion range. raising the ceiling, a default for the nation. he spoke out against the fairfax chamber and other chambers, and now he is saying, "wait a minute. we cannot make cuts." when he is running as the guy who wants to make cuts. he has more sides then a rubik cube. >> what your so-called plan would do to jobs. i think you should be taking into account what the impact is on jobs, and our economy, which is a major, major concern. you talked about bob mcdonnell and eric cantor. what they did was pass a measure that would avert these devastating cuts to our national defense and jobs in virginia. what has this than that done? absolutely nothing. they have not passed a budget in 3.5 years.
. the assembly will hear now and address by barack obama, president of the united states of america. a request for a call to -- his recognize his excellency. [applause] on behalf of the general assembly, i am honored to welcome to the united nations, barack obama. and to invite him to address the assembly. >> mr. president, secretary general, fellow delegates, ladies and gentlemen, i would like to begin today by telling you about an american named chris stevens. chris was born in a town called grand valley california. the son of a lawyer and a musician. as a young man, he joined the peace corps, and taught english in morocco. he came to love and respect the people of north africa and the middle east. he would carry that commitment throughout his life. as a diplomat, he worked from egypt to syria. from saudi arabia to libya. he was known for walking the streets of the cities where he worked, meeting as many people as he could, speaking arabic, listening with a broad smile. chris went to benghazi in the early days of the libyan revolution, a riding on a cargo ship. as america's representative, w
wanted to, first of all, i believe in check and balances in the constitution, and the united states says we should have. i don't want one party running anything. the bottom line is people -- i think 80% of the people in the united states don't even know the constitution, and for limited government, not as a progressive, which, by the way, is what obama is, a progressive, just like hillary clinton, who admitted she was. host: let's not go too far off the rails here. i understand that the constitution, the check and balances that the constitution refers to is between the legislative, the judicial, and the executive branch, and doesn't really mention the establishment of a two-party system. caller: you need a two-party system. look what happened the first two years -- even though it took obama two years to get the healthcare through, they still had everything right there. unless you have a complete representative, you know, in there that represents everyone and just not one side, like all progressives or all republicans, you don't have those checks and balances, whether it's the legislative
] in the united states senate. still fighting for those who count on him to be their voice. using his intellect and his he will consequence he has fought to improve our health care choices and to protect our environment. and he called attention to the threat of terrorism before september 11. [applause] you know, i married the smartest, toughest, sweetest man i know. and in two days we will celebrate 27 years of marriage. [cheers and applause] the way we always do. we'll do it the way we always do, at wendy's. [laughter] whether it's wendy's or washington, i found that it's true. it's not where you go, it's who you go with. [cheers and applause] but none of the things i've mentioned are the reasons i married john edwards. i married him because he was the single most optimistic person that i have ever known. he knew there was a brighter day ahead even as he swept the floors in the cotton mill as a high school student. he knew if he worked hard enough, he could be the first in his family to go to college. he knew that he could outwork and outtough any battalion of lawyers to find justice. and he c
a movie. host: look at this and we'll get comments on it. >> it was april 20, 2009 and the united states was opening the antiracism conference in geneva, switzerland, it was designed as a forum to reach the u.n.'s moral authority to end racism and discrimination, strengthening human rights everywhere. racism is a denial of human rights, pure and simple. there comes a time in the course of human kind when we must stand firm on the fundamental principles that binds us. there comes a time to reamp our faith in fundamental human rights and dignity and worth of us all. >> it was only the second conference of its kind in the u.n. 60 year history and as the secretary general concluded his opening remarks the man of united nations delivered the keynote -- tapped to deliver the keynote address wait the wings. >> the time is now, ladies and gentlemen. >> who would it stph-b who would it be, the guiding light who could lead the conference toward achieving its vital goals, who better than this guy,? >> and now to the podium -- >> [applause] >> this is mahmoud ahmadinejad, president of iran. somethin
united states assistance packages focused on developing the institutions of liberty, the rule of law and property rights. >> we believe that freedom and self-determination are not unique to one culture. isn't that simply american values or western values? they are universal values. and even as there will be huge challenges to come, i am convinced that ultimately, government is for the people, by the people. it is more likely to bring about the stability, prosperity and individual opportunity to serve as a basis for peace and our world. >> a october 3, mitt romney and president obama will meet in their first presidential debate, moderate. watch on c-span. your reaction, calls, e-mails and tweets after the debate. follow online at c-span.org. >> george washington university hosted a discussion yesterday on oil and gas production in the persian gulf. focusing mostly iraq. they speak about tensions between saudi arabia and iran. -- for the fall semester. and i would just mention in the way of an advertisement that we will be having our next program on october 23. it will be on jordan. jo
the general assembly adopted a resolution considering the state of palestine a non-member state of the united nations during this session. we are confident that the vast majority of the countries of the world support our endeavor aimed at salvaging the chances for peace. in our endeavor, we do not seek to delegitimize an existing state, that is, israel, but rather to assert the state that must be recognized, palestine. [applause] we are not attempting to delegitimized them. they are trying to delegitimize us. mr. president, ladies and gentlemen, more than at 64 years have passed. a large portion of those who were the immediate victims and witnessed it have died, have died with their memories preserved in their minds and hearts about their beautiful world that was devastated, their homes that were demolished, their peaceful villages that were erased from existence. about the renaissance that was undermined. about their loved ones, women and children, who were killed in massacres, attacks, raids, and incursions. about their beautiful country that was the beacon of coexistence, tolerance, progre
this country faces the starkest choice for president of the united states that has in that least my lifetime. that means in all of your lifetime. but for all the talk governor romney and congressman ryan have engaged in, they do not have the courage yet to tell you what their policies for this nation really are. it will shock you, i have the courage to tell you this morning with their policies are. [laughter] it's amazing if you listen to them. they talk so much about how they care about medicare. you would think it was a republican idea the way they talk about it. you think it was republicans supporting it. they talk about how they want to preserve it. they do it sincerely and talk about how they sincerely want to preserve and protect the benefits for all those people, guaranteeing all those people on medicare now, the 30 million seniors that nothing will change. if you listen to them these days, you would think that had been a republican plan all along. that's what they say and that is what they exude believe, and these are facts. they don't tell you that there fan with a meat -- their pla
to be realistic about how we can tackle these challenges. if there is a crisis that i see in the united states for the long term, it is not the temporal issue of how we will deal with money. because i am very confident we will be able to deal with that. it is how will we bring that -- bring back our sense of what we can accomplish together as americans when we are realistic about those challenges. that is the thing i think about the word "crisis" in this country. >> mayor castro is not the first to suggest that. for 10 years now, we heard that the government is not asking all of us to do enough. >> it is interesting. the word "sacrifice," when i hear a politician say that, it usually means grab your wallet. it usually means increasing taxes. and i will give president obama credit to in his the first presidential candidate since walter mondale to run explicitly on a platform that he will raise taxes. >> he is saying he will raise taxes on the wealthy. >> according to the supreme court, he already has raised taxes. that was the basis on which the supreme court of held obamacare, that it was a ta
enough experience to be president of the united states. host: now to south carolina, a president obama supporter, dori. caller: what i heard people say really concerns me. i think the president has been very clear on his position. i don't think people are looking at information. i think a lot of them are listening to news programs a lot of times. one of the things that really concerns me, and i don't hear enough about this, i don't want other people telling you about my health and what decisions i have to make for my life and my morality. there is too much conversation from a lot of people in the gop and mitt romney is not an independent thinker. he will not stand up against people who are taking a real hard-line position to the right on those issues. host: were you overly excited -- how would you describe yourself in 2008 when you voted for president obama? excited about his administration? compare that to how you feel now. caller: i was not excited. i was convinced he was the right person, especially when sarah palin was elected as vice president. i am more convinced this election th
candidates for president of the united states, sponsored by the commission on presidential debates. the candidates are: independent candidate ross perot, governor bill clinton, the democratic nominee, and president george bush, the republican nominee. i am jim lehrer of the macneil- lehrer news hour on pbs, and i will be the moderator for this 90-minute event, which is taking place before an audience in the athletic complex on the campus of washington university in st. louis, missouri. three journalists will be asking questions tonight. they are john mashek of the boston globe, ann compton of abc news, and sander vanocur, a freelance journalist. we will follow a format agreed to by representatives of the clinton and bush campaigns. that agreement contains no restrictions on the content or subject matter of the questions. each candidate will have up to 2 minutes for a closing statement. the order of those, as well as the questioning, was determined by a drawing. the first question goes to mr. perot. he will have 2 minutes to answer, to be followed by rebuttals of one minute each fro
be accurately described as young. >> thank you so much. there is no organization in the united states that is better at serving as a forum for the principal legal issues of the day. i have been asked to comment as well on the voting rights and same-sex marriage issues. she has done such a good job in describing these cases. the two points i would make about same-sex and voting rights act cases is why would the justices get involved because these cases are not on the docket. the court family takes only one out of 100 cases. but doma has been invalidated by a federal court of appeals. if we're going to strike down a federal statute, that is our job, the supreme court's job. the voting rights act cases, several of them come on appeal. generally, you have to ask the supreme court to grant review in your case. but there are tiny slivers of cases in the united states code that allow them to go to the supreme court could but the voting rights cases they almost have to take. they suggested very serious concerns about the constitutionality of section 5. they have a lot of interest in this issu
. it should happen i very local level, from a council level up to the president of the united states. i think what this election is about, if we're going to frame the debate with respect to black americans, to me, this election is about why is it that in 1960, we had 36% of black males who were incarcerated in 1960. i was reading the moynihan report, which the deceased daniel patrick moynihan wrote for president johnson about the state of black america as he sought in 1964. -- as he saw it in 1964. today, we have 55% of blacks in prison and in 1964, when he wrote this report to give to president johnson, he said the biggest thing he saw, the crisis affecting black americans was the breakdown of black families. at the time, yet 23% of black americans being born into -- you had a 23% of black americans being born into single-family -- single-parent families and today it is 73%. today, the issue is crime and why are so many black males being killed in chicago and philadelphia and the breakdown of the family. whoever you are going to vote for president or on the local level, you should ask how ar
follow that up. the israeli government, the prime minister, at least, has challenged the united states to define a red line or else is would be able to act on its own without clearing anything with the united states. this sounds to me like an ultimatum. is that what it was? was a governnt of israel giving us an ultimatum? was that wise? >> look, israel was in my portfolio. i have traveled there 13 times. i have had hundreds of meetings with israeli officials. we are in lock step with them on how far iran is toward getting a nuclear weapon capability. we are in step with them on the objective of preventing iran from getting a nuclear weapon. they do not have the same military capability of the united states has. they do not believe they can wait as long as we can. we need to work together to align our clocks. president netanyahu is expressing concerns. the president shares those concerns. it is a huge threat to israel and the interest of the united states. this president has made clear that all options will be considered to address that. the current israeli government would like the u.s
speech he would say the united states was the only country on earth where we put our hands over our hearts when we sing our national anthem, which was quickly disproved by just looking on youtube. people around the world going like this and singing their national anthem. he dropped at the very next day. he never said it again. >> he paid the price. >> maybe. >> i would say that is an example of actually changing behavior, which i think happens rarely and in small increments. >> i think the other thing we were talking about before the panel with brendan, the other thing we do not know, how many conversations are going on with campaign message people, with people making ads, with speechwriters, they are talking about wording. how often are they saying, if we say that, the fact checkers will get us? i suspect that is happening a lot. the only evidence i have of that is a column written by connie schultz, who is married to sherrod brown, who says that happens in the brown campaign. i suspect that is happening in many campaigns. there is so much fact checking going on, not just with our
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)

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